Thursday, 19 November 2015

Dorset Buttons - How it all started

I thought handmade buttons would be an interesting accessory to any embroidered/textile item and somewhere in the back of my mind I had seen these buttons before but had no idea what they were called.  So a after a short search on Google I found what I was looking for.  I had no idea there was so much history behind a Dorset Button.  If you'd like to read more about them, this is just one of the links I found

A Dorset Button is a ring, originally cut from a horn of a Dorset Horn sheep, covered in embroidery thread.  These days plastic or metal rings are the more usual choice!

I found myself a tutorial and began experimenting ...

red dorset button

I started with this one above, which is a basic Crosswheel Dorset Button.  I was very pleased with the result and eager to try out others.  Unfortunately I couldn't find tutorials for other designs so now I had the basic idea I set about adapting this design using inspiration from other pictures I found on Google.

Yellow and white beaded dorset button

I wanted to incorporate some beads, so this was my second creation.  By now I was getting rather addicted to these little creations!
The rings I first used were about 3cm in diameter and about 5mm thick but I only had three of them so needed more supplies, urgently whilst I had the bug!!!

bunch of flowers dorset button

The rings I found next were slightly smaller, just over 2.5cm in diameter and just under 3mm thick.  I created a fan shape with this one and after weaving over the spokes stitched french knots to give a blossom tree effect.  I was very pleased with how neat I managed to get the back and thought a similar design may make pretty earrings.

bunny rabbit easter dorset button

As I said these really are quite addictive so I thought I would try something a little quirkier!
As Easter is just around the corner an Easter Bunny came to mind!
Not quite your traditional Dorset Button but good fun all the same.

variegated silk thread dorset button

For the last one I returned to a more traditional style and used a silk variegated thread